Looking to dive into some great poetry through your tablet or other device?  Check out some of these wonderful electronic poetry materials offered through Libby/Overdrive.  The full collection can be browsed here!
Night Sky with Exit Wounds by Ocean Vuong: “Reading Vuong is like watching a fish move: he manages the varied currents of English with muscled intuition. His poems are by turns graceful and wonderstruck. His lines are both long and short, his pose narrative and lyric, his diction formal and insouciant. From the outside, Vuong has fashioned a poetry of inclusion.”—The New Yorker
Black Imagination: Black Voices on Black Futures curated by Natasha Marin: A comprehensive history of anti-black racism focuses on the lives of five major players in American history, including Cotton Mather and Thomas Jefferson, and highlights the debates that took place between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and antiracists.
An American Sunrise by Joy Harjo: A nationally best-selling volume of wise, powerful poetry from the first Native American Poet Laureate of the United States.  In this stunning collection, Harjo finds blessings in the abundance of her homeland and confronts the site where the Mvskoke people, including her own ancestors, were forcibly displaced. From her memory of her mother’s death, to her beginnings in the Native rights movement, to the fresh road with her beloved, Harjo’s personal life intertwines with tribal histories to create a space for renewed beginnings.
Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur: Rupi Kaur reads milk and honey, her New York Times bestselling collection of poetry and prose about survival, the experience of violence, abuse, love, loss, and femininity.

*Also available in eBook format.
Dearly by Margaret Atwood: In Dearly, Margaret Atwood’s first collection of poetry in over a decade, Atwood addresses themes such as love, loss, the passage of time, the nature of nature and – zombies. Her new poetry is introspective and personal in tone, but wide-ranging in topic. In poem after poem, she casts her unique imagination and unyielding, observant eye over the landscape of a life carefully and intuitively lived.
I Would Leave Me If I Could by Halsey: Grammy Award–nominated, platinum-selling musician Halsey is heralded as one of the most compelling voices of her generation. In I Would Leave Me If I Could, she reveals never-before-heard poetry of longing, love, and the nuances of bipolar disorder.
I am the Rage by Dr. Martina McGowan: For fans of Amanda Gorman’s The Hill We Climb and Morgan Parker’s There are More Beautiful Things Than Beyoncé, comes a diverse poetry collection like no other. From two Black women of two different generations, I am The Rage provides insights that no think piece on racism can; putting readers in the position of feeling, reflecting, and facing what it means to be Black in America.
The Odyssey by Homer: Composed at the rosy-fingered dawn of world literature almost three millennia ago, The Odyssey is a poem about violence and the aftermath of war; about wealth, poverty and power; about marriage and family; about travelers, hospitality, and the yearning for home.
Why I Wake Early by Mary Oliver: The forty-seven new works in this volume include poems on crickets, toads, trout lilies, black snakes, goldenrod, bears, greeting the morning, watching the deer, and, finally, lingering in happiness. Each poem is imbued with the extraordinary perceptions of a poet who considers the everyday in our lives and the natural world around us and finds a multitude of reasons to wake early.
Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman: Leaves of Grass is a collection of poems by Walt Whitman originally published in 1855 at the poet’s own expense. Criticized when first released for Whitman’s use of free verse and his rather racy depictions of sexual love and the senses, Leaves of Grass is a celebration of the human form, the material world and nature.